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Sharing Activity with The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear

Minilesson for The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry BearExtension Activity for Use With The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear

Objective: Teach the importance of sharing using The Little, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear

In this lesson, you will provide students with the opportunity to experience sharing and scarcity using  “The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear” as a springboard for your discussion.

 

Materials:

  • A copy of The Little Mouse, The Red Rep Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear
  • Markers
  • Index card

Connect

  • Begin the lesson by gathering the students together.
  • Ask the students to think of a time when someone shared something with them.  Ask them how it made them feel when someone shared with them.
  • Ask the students to think of a time when they shared something with someone else.  Ask them how it make them feel when they shared with someone else.
  • Tell them to turn and tell a partner about a time when they shared or about the time when someone shared with them.

Teach

  • Read “The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear.
  • As you read ask the students to talk about how they would feel if they were in the mouse’s position.  Would they go to such great lengths to hid their strawberry  Would they share their strawberry with the reader?

Active Engagement

  • Pay a version of tag with your students.
  • Draw a picture of a strawberry on an index card.
  • Give the strawberry card to a child.
  • Pick another child to be the “Big Hungry Bear.”  The “Big Hungry Bear” is it, and must chase all of the other children.
  • The child with the strawberry card is immune to the Bear’s tag.  If the Bear tags a child, that child must freeze in place until the strawberry card child comes and gives him the card.
  • Then that child becomes the immune child and gets to choose another child to be the “Big Hungry Bear.”
  • Continue play
  • Ask the students the following questions then invite them to turn and talk about their answers with a partner:
    • How did you feel when the Big Hungry Bear was chasing you?
    • Did you want immunity?  Why or why not?
    • How did it feel to be the child with the strawberry card?  How did it feel when someone gave you the card?  How did it feel when you gave the card away?

Link

  • Explain that  understanding how it feels to share is a good thing for readers to do. When readers are able to experience the same things that characters in books experience, they are able to make text-to-self connections and improve their reading comprehension.

Karis Needham is an elementary-school teacher and freelance writer. She taught herself to read at the age of three and has been reading ever since! In her free time, she enjoys writing, watching Jeopardy, and scrapbooking.